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A&A manuscript no. 

(will be inserted by hand later) 



Your thesaurus codes are: 
11.1.2,11.5.1,11.10.1,11.14.1 



ASTRONOMY 

AND 
ASTROPHYSICS 

February 1, 2008 



The HST snapshot survey of the B2 sample of low 
luminosity radio-galaxies: a picture gallery * 

A. Capetti 1 , H.R. de Ruiter 2 3 , R. Fanti 4 3 , R. Morganti 5 , P. Parma 3 , and M.-H. Ulrich 6 



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Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, Strada Osservatorio 25, 1-10025 Pino Torinese, Italy 

Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani, 1, 1-40127 Italy 

Istituto di Radioastronomia, Via Gobetti 101, 1-40129, Bologna, Italy 

Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita di Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, 1-40126 Bologna, Italy 

Netherlands Foundation for Research in Astronomy, Postbus 2, NL-7990 AA, Dwingeloo, The Netherlands 

European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748, Garching, Germany 



Received 31 May 2000; accepted 31 August 2000 



Abstract. A Hubble Space Telescope snapshot survey of 
the B2 sample of low luminosity radio galaxies has, at 
present, produced V and I images of 41 objects. Together 
with 16 images of B2 sources taken from the HST archive, 
there are now high resolution optical data for ~ 57 % 
of the sample. All host galaxies are luminous ellipticals, 
except one which is a spiral galaxy, while another one 
turns out to be a misidentification. 

We present an album of the images of the B2 radio 
galaxies observed so far, and give a brief description of 
the optical morphology of the galaxies. Dust features (in 
the form of disks, lanes or irregular patches) are seen in 
most of the galaxies of the sample, ~ 58 %. Compact 
optical cores are also very common (18/57). A prelimi- 
nary analysis has revealed the presence of an optical jet in 
three objects, indicating they can be detected in a sizeable 
percentage in these low luminosity radio sources. Bright- 
ness profiles of dust-free galaxies are well represented by a 
Nuker law and all shows the existence of a resolved shallow 
cusp. 



Key words: Galaxies: active; Galaxies: elliptical and 
lenticular, cD; Galaxies: jets; Galaxies: nuclei 



1. INTRODUCTION 

In the past few years, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) 
imaging of radiogalaxies has provided very valuable in- 
formation on the optical structure of these sources. In 
particular, the HST/WFPC2 snapshot survey of the 3CR 
sample produced a large and uniform database of images 



Send offprint requests to: capetti@to.astro.it 

* Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space 
Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, 
which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 
5-26555 and by STScI grant GO-3594.01-91A 



essential for a stat istical analysis of th eir host galaxies 
(Martel et al. |l999i Dc Koff et al. |l996| ). 

These studies revealed the presence of new and inter- 
esting features, some of them almost exclusively associated 
to low luminosity FR I radio-galaxies. 

For example, HST observations have shown the pres- 
ence of dust in a large fraction of radio galaxies which, 
however, takes the form of circum-nuclear disks (Jaffe et 
al. |1993| ; De Koff et al. |l996j ; De Juan et al. |1996[ , Verdoes 
Klein et al. 1999) only in FR I sources. These structures 
have been naturally identified with the reservoir of ma- 
terial which will ultimately accrete into the central black 
hole and might provide a direct approach to measure key 
parameters such as the accretion rate and the black hole 
mass in AGNs. Although the precise relationship between 
the symmetry axis of these disks and that of the sub- 
parsec scale structure is not yet fully established, they 
can represent useful indicators fo r the orientation of the 
central engine (Capetti & Celotti 1999 ). Several new op- 
tical jets ha ve als o been found in th e HST image s (e.g . 
Sparks et al. |l995| , Baum e t al. J1997J Martel et al. |1998|) : 
according to Martel et al. ( |1999| ) they are seen in ~ 13 % 
of nearby (z < 0.1) 3CR radio galaxies and, with the only 
exception of 3C 273, all are found in FR I radio-galaxies. 

FR I sources also represent an essential ingredient 
in the Unified Schemes of radio-loud AGNs as the mis- 
oriented counter part of BL Lac objects (see Urry & 
Padovani 1995 for a review). Indeed, recent radio stud- 
ies have provided strong evidence in favour of relativistic 
beaming in their jets (Laing et al. 1999). Host galaxies 



of BL Lacs have been studied with the HST by Urry et 



al. (1999), and a similar analysis of galaxies hosting FR I 



sources should clarify if there is continuity in the prop- 
erties of the respective nuclear regions, i.e. if any differ- 
ences are due solely to orientation effects. Furthermore, 
Chiaberge, Capetti & Celotti (1999) have shown that the 



nuclear sources commonly found in FR I might represent 
the optical counter part of the synchrotron radio cores. 



Capctti et al.: HST survey of the B2 sample 



This opens the possibility of testing the unified models by 
directly comparing the anisotropic optical jet emission in 
BL Lac and FR I. 

As many of the most extensively studied FR I radio 
galaxies are part of the B2 sample of low luminosity radio 



al. |1987| , P arma et al. |1987| , De Ruiter et al. |1990[ Mor- 



galaxies (Fanti et al. 1987), this prompted us to perform 
a complete, high resolution optical study of these ~ 100 
sources. The radio characteristics of the B2 sample are 
different and in some sense complementary to those of the 
3CR already studied with HST and they can fill the gap 
between the " radio quiet & normal" and the " radio loud" 
ellipticals. 

A statistical study of such a large sample of low lumi- 
nosity radio galaxies will enable us to establish how fre- 
quently we can detect optical jets, optical nuclear sources, 
circum-nuclear dusty disks and dust lanes and what is 
their relationship with the radio properties. Combining 
the HST observations of the B2 sample with those already 
existing of the complementary 3CR radio galaxies and BL 
Lac objects it will therefore be possible to find the sim- 
ilarities and differences of the optical nuclear properties 
as a function of radio power and morphological type of 
the parent optical objects. Particularly relevant will be, 
in this respect, the comparison of the optical brightness 
distribution of these samples of active sources with non 
active galaxies. 

The organization of this paper is as follows; in Sect. 
we briefly describe the B2 sample and give some general 
information. In Sect. || the present status of the HST ob- 
servations is discussed and some relevant data on the pro- 
gram are given. The results are presented in Sect. 0, in 
the form of images and notes on the individual sources. 
Finally, in Sect, g we give a brief summary and discuss 
future work planned for the B2 sample. 

Throughout this paper we use a Hubble constant H = 
100 km s" 1 Mpc" 1 and q = 0.5. 

2. THE SAMPLE 

Here we give a short description of the properties of the 
B2 sample of low luminosity radio galaxies. It consists of 
100 ellipti cal ga laxiespl ident ified with B2 radio sources 



1975). The sample is com- 



(Colla et al. |1975| ; Fanti et al. 
plete down to 0.25 Jy at 408 MHz and down to a limiting 
magnitude m v = 16.5. Since the sample was selected at 
low radio frequency, it is largely unbiased for orientation. 
The sample spans the power range between 10 22 and 10 25 
WHz -1 at 1.4 GHz with a pronounced peak around 10 24 
WHz -1 and therefore gives an excellent representation of 
the radio source types encountered below and around the 
break in the radio luminosity function. 

The B2 sample has been extensively studied at ra- 
dio wavelengths, especially since the 1980's (see Fanti et 

1 the number of galaxies constituting the sample has recently 
undergone some changes. The present definition of the sample 
will be discussed elsewhere 



ganti et al. 1997). Comparison with Einstein Satellite X- 
ray data was done by Morganti et al. (1988). A num- 



ber of B2 radio galaxies were subsequently observed with 



ROS AT (Fe retti et al. [1995[ , Massaglia et al. |1996| Trussoni 
et al. 19971). Optical work on the sample has somewhat 
lagged behind, but a complete broad band imaging survey 
of the B2 sample was carried out by Gonzalez-Serrano et 
al. ( 1993| ) and Gonzalez-Serrano & Carballo (200C), while 
narrow band Ha images were obtained by Morganti et al. 
( 1992 ). The IRAS prop erties of the sample were studied 
by Impey & Gregorini ( |1993| ). 



3. OBSERVATIONS AND DATA REDUCTION 

Up till the present HST imaging was done for 57 of the 
~ 100 radio galaxies. In the course of our HST program 
observations were obtained for 41 B2 galaxies, while pub- 
lic archive data exist for 16 additional objects, usually be- 
cause these sources are also part of the 3C catalog (see 
De Koff et al. 119961 Martel et al. I1999L Verdoes-Klein 



et al. 1999). The HST observations also confirmed that 



the B2 radio galaxy 1441+26 is a misidentification (see 
Sect. 4.1) as already suggested by Gonzalez-Serrano & 
Carballo ( |2000| ). 

Our program observations were obtained between 
April 9th and September 1st 1999, using the Wide Field 
and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). 

The pixel size of the Planetary Camera, in which all 
targets are located, is 0'.'0455 and the 800 x 800 pixels 
cover a field of view of 36" x 36". Two broad band fil- 
ters were used, namely F555W and F814W, which cover 
the spectral regions 4500-6500 A and 7000-9500 A respec- 
tively. Although their transmission curve does not match 
exactly those of standard filters we will usually refer to 
them as V and I filters. The data have been processed 
through the PODPS (Post Observation Data Processing 
System) pipeline for bias removal and flat fielding (Biretta 



et al. 1996) 



One image was taken through each filter and the ex- 
posure time was always set to 300 s (with the exception of 
B2 2116+26, which was observed for 350 s in the V band, 
as I band images were already available in the archive). 

In order to minimize the overhead time associated to 
the read-out of the camera and to improve the efficiency 
of the program, we preferred to obtain a single image for 
each color as this enables us, e.g., to study also the color 
distribution in the inner regions of the galaxies. Obviously, 
with this choice, the removal of cosmic rays cannot be 
performed following the standard approach. 

We thus identified cosmic rays events based on the 
comparison between the V and I images: each pixel where 
the ratio of the two images differed by more than a factor 
of 1.5 from its average value over the target and at the 
same time exceeded a threshold of 10 counts, was flagged 
as cosmic ray. The region within an expansion radius of 1.5 



Capetti et al.: HST survey of the B2 sample 



Table 1. Log of archival HST observations 



Name 


Filter 


T'cxp \S) 


Date 


Prog. ID 


0055+30 


F814W 


460 


16/02/98 


6673 




F555W 


460 


16/02/98 


6673 


0104+32 


F702W 


280 


19/01/95 


5476 


0120+33 


F555W 


1600 


13/07/97 


6587 


1003+35 


F702W 


280 


19/10/94 


5476 




F555W 


600 


12/06/96 


6348 


1217+29 


F814W 


460 


07/05/94 


5454 




F555W 


1000 


07/05/94 


5454 


1251+27 


F702W 


560 


16/03/94 


5476 




F555W 


600 


06/06/96 


6348 


1321+31 


F814W 


460 


04/11/98 


6673 




F555W 


460 


04/11/98 


6673 


1350+31 


F702W 


280 


15/01/95 


5476 


1502+26 


F702W 


280 


12/09/94 


5476 


1511+26 


F702W 


280 


29/11/94 


5476 


1615+32 


F702W 


280 


29/04/95 


5476 




F555W 


600 


19/10/96 


6348 


1626+39 


F702W 


280 


09/09/94 


5476 


1726+31 


F702W 


280 


25/01/95 


5476 


1833+32 


F702W 


280 


25/06/94 


5476 


2229+39 


F702W 


280 


06/08/94 


5476 


2335+26 


F702W 


280 


23/01/95 


5476 









I 








1 


1 ' 




1 


: 






















• 


: 




1000 














o • o 

3>° *V* »°" 


• o 
9 


.• 


1 




100 






• 




• 

• 
• 


• 




- 


















• o • 






- 




10 








o 

« 




o 

• 


• * • 






= 


» 




































• 













1) 

N 


1 

0.1 

0.01 

0.001 


r • 


I 






• 






o 

• 

• 

o 

1 




1 


= 



log(P tol /WHz-') 

Fig. 1. Size vs radio power diagram for sources observed 
(filled circles) and not yet observed (empty circles) with 
HST 



pixel around each of them was replaced by interpolation of 
the nearest good pixels. Clearly this method is appropriate 
only for extended targets free of large gradients both in 
color and in intensity, such as are the objects studied for 
this project. A small number of faint cosmic rays and hot 
pixels are still present in the cleaned images. These were 
removed individually (with the IRAF task IMEDIT). The 
overall fraction of bad pixels is ~ 1 %: the images are not 
significantly affected by this process. Visual inspection of 
these final images indicates that the resulting images can 
be considered to be essentially free from strong cosmic 
rays that could have disturbed any further analysis (for 
example in the construction of brightness profiles). 

The conversion from counts to the standard WFPC2 
photometric system was derived using the header keyword 
PHOTFLAM of each filter which is accurate to within 2 
% in the visible. 

The archival images were reduced following the stan- 
dard PODPS and cosmic rays removal procedure; the ob- 
serving log for these sources is reported in Tab. ||. 

The relevant data of the observed sources are given in 
Tab. Bt in columns 1 and 2 we give the radio source names 
(B2 and other), in column 3 the redshift, in columns 4 
and 5 the total and core power at 1.4 Ghz respectively, in 
columns 6 and 7 the largest angular size in arcsec and the 
largest linear size in kpc, the position angle of the main 
radio axis (in degrees) in column 8, where a "j" indicates 
the direction of the radio jets; finally the Fanaroff-Riley 
type is given in column 9. In a few cases no FR classifi- 
cation is possible (because of the lack of sufficiently high 
resolution observations), while for some other sources the 



FR type is given as I-II; this classification concerns sources 
with a hybrid structure, i.e. in which both FR I and FR II 
characteristics are present. 

While there is no bias in the selection of the sources of 
our program (they were chosen randomly as far as their 
radio and optical properties are concerned), a bias might 
have been introduced by the inclusion of the 16 archive 
sources. We thus compared various parameters of the ob- 
served sub-sample with those of the sources that were not 
observed by HST. This is illustrated in Figs. Q, | and [| 
no significant differences emerged except for a small effect 
in redshift and total power. The median redshift and ra- 
dio power of the two sub-samples are z = 0.055l^oii, log 
Pt = 24.05±8;{g and z = 0.067+°;™?, log P t = 2422+1°,! 
respectively, thus only marginally different. We can then 
consider the sources observed with HST as well represen- 
tative of the whole B2 sample. 

4. RESULTS 

In Fig. 4 we present the final broad band images of the 
innermost regions of all 57 B2 radio galaxies observed. In 
the left (right) bottom corner is indicated the size of the 
field of view in arcsec (kpc). Since the B2 sample con- 
tains ~ 100 objects this means that at present the HST 
observation are complete at the level of ~ 57 %. 

A preliminary analysis of the HST images is presented 
in the notes on individual sources given below. In particu- 
lar we checked for the presence of dust features, a compact 
optical core and an optical jet. The identification of opti- 
cal cor es is b ased on the procedure described in Chiaberge 
et al. ( 1999 ), i.e. a source brightness profile which, within 



4 Capetti et al.: HST survey of the B2 sample 

Table 2. Summary of the 1.4 GHz radio data of the sample. 



B2 


Other 


Rcdshift 


log Pt 


logPc 


l.a.s. 


1.1. s. 


p. a. 


FR 


Name 


Name 




(P in W/Hz) 


(P in W/Hz) 


arcscc 


kpc degr. 


type 


0034+25 




0.0321 


23.20 


21.77 


274 


120 


-87j 


I 


0055+26 


4C26.03 


0.0472 


24.61 


22.30 


240 


150 


-40j 


I 


0055+30 




0.0167 


24.08 


23.30 


3450 


811 


-50 


I 


0104+32 


3C 31 


0.0169 


24.21 


22.63 


1900 


452 


-20j 


I 


0116+31 


4C31.04 


0.0592 


24.95 


22.80 


0.1 


0.08 


-80 




0120+33 




0.0164 


22.30 


20.76 


130 


30 


-80 


I 


0149+35 




0.0160 


22.33 


21.54 


191 


43 


05 


I 


0648+27 




0.0409 


23.62 


22.92 


0.02 


0.011 


- 




0708+32 




0.0672 


23.51 


23.02 


8 


7 


-5 




0722+30 




0.0191 


22.67 


22.02 


35 


9 


-85 


I 


0755+37 




0.0413 


24.49 


23.59 


138 


70 


-05 


I 


0908+37 




0.1040 


24.84 


23.46 


51 


63 


15 


I-II 


0915+32 




0.0620 


24.00 


22.56 


540 


432 


30 


I 


0924+30 




0.0266 


23.52 


<20.5 


720 


264 


00 


I 


1003+26 




0.1165 


24.01 


22.10 


6 


8 


10 




1003+35 


3C236 


0.0989 


25.78 


24.00 


2400 


2860 


-00 


II 


1005+28 




0.1476 


24.25 


22.60 


240 


391 


-25 


III 


1101+38 




0.0300 


23.97 


23.33 


257 


106 


90 




1113+24 




0.1021 


23.65 


<22.35 


30 


37 


50 


I 


1204+34 




0.0788 


24.47 


23.05 


51 


50 


-50 


II 


1217+29 




0.0021 


21.24 


21.22 


0.03 


0.001 






1251+27 


3C277.3 


0.0857 


25.37 


23.30 


45 


48 


-22 


II 


1256+28 




0.0224 


23.05 


21.03 


260 


81 




I 


1257+28 




0.0239 


23.08 


20.69 


20 


7 




I 


1321+31 




0.0161 


23.85 


21.77 


720 


103 


-60 


I 


1322+36 


4C36.24 


0.0175 


24.55 


22.38 


53 


13 


15 


I 


1339+26 


4C26.41 


0.0757 


24.30 


<22.5 


285 


271 


30 


I 


1346+26 


4C26.42 


0.0633 


24.55 


23.37 


11 


9 


25 


I 


1347+28 




0.0724 


24.05 


22.27 


47 


43 


50 


I-II 


1350+31 


3C293 


0.0452 


25.03 


23.34 


331 


199 


90j 


III 


1357+28 




0.0629 


24.03 


22.45 


139 


113 


Oj 


I 


1422+26 




0.0370 


24.00 


22.24 


140 


70 


-85 


I 


1430+25 


4C25.46 


0.0813 


24.20 


<21.9 


50 


51 


20 


I 


1447+27 




0.0306 


22.78 


22.51 


4 


2 


27 




1450+28 




0.1265 


24.50 


23.01 


200 


290 


-60 


I 


1455+28 


4C28.38 


0.1411 


25.22 


<23.03 


213 


330 


38 


II 


1457+29 




0.1470 


24.89 


23.83 


81 


132 


-25 


I 


1502+26 


3C310 


0.0540 


25.36 


23.40 


200 


184 


-15 


I 


1511+26 


3C315 


0.1078 


25.34 


<24.3 


125 


160 




I 


1512+30 




0.0931 


23.82 


21.00 


22 


25 


-17 




1521+28 


4C28.39 


0.0825 


24.58 


23.50 


200 


205 


-30j 


I 


1525+29 




0.0653 


23.98 


22.10 


23 


19 


30j 


I 


1527+30 




0.1143 


24.05 


22.80 


45 


60 


45j 


I 


1553+24 




0.0426 


23.57 


23.01 


285 


162 


-40j 


I 


1557+26 




0.0442 


22.81 


<22.80 


2 


1 


- 




1610+29 




0.0313 


22.93 


<21.0 


135 


58 


70 


I 


1613+27 




0.0647 


24.03 


22.69 


31 


26 


-37 


I 


1615+32 


3C332 


0.1520 


25.79 


23.43 


91 


152 


15 


II 


1626+39 


3C338 


0.0303 


24.49 


23.16 


103 


43 


00 


I 


1658+30A 


4C30.31 


0.0351 


23.88 


22.89 


160 


76 


55 


I-II 


1726+31 


3C357 


0.1670 


25.89 


23.34 


107 


191 


-70 


II 


1827+32 




0.0659 


24.07 


23.08 


360 


304 


75 


I 


1833+32 


3C382 


0.0578 


25.07 


23.85 


170 


128 


50 


II 


2116+26 




0.0164 


22.79 


22.08 


457 


100 


-23j 


I 


2229+39 


3C449 


0.0181 


24.03 


22.11 


840 


213 


10j 


I 


2236+35 




0.0277 


23.47 


21.74 


47 


19 


45j 


I 


2335+26 


3C465 


0.0301 


24.88 


23.22 


480 


198 


-55j 


I 



5 pixels from the center, shows a FWHM consistent with 
the HST Point Spread Function (< 0'.'08). As to the pres- 
ence of optical jets, we just checked that after subtraction 
of a model galaxy, some emission was left at the location of 
the radio jet. We stress that a more detailed analysis will 
be carried out by us elsewhere. A summary of the optical 
data is given in Tab. 0, in which we give the names of the 
sources (B2 and other) in columns 1 and 2, the redshift 
in column 3; the presence of dust is indicated in column 4 
as d (disk- like structure), 1 (dust lane, band or filament), 



p (irregular patches); if possible we measure a position 
angle of the disk or band and the P.A. (in degrees from 
north through east) is given in column 5; the presence of 
unresolved optical cores and jets is indicated in columns 
6 and 7. 



4-.1. Notes on the individual sources 

0034+25: There is a prominent dust band in the cen- 
ter of this galaxy, likely a highly inclined dusty disk ori- 



E 10 



I I 


i 

i — 
t — 

1-:-: 


1 








3 


1 


1 


' 


m m 


-- 


i i i i i i i i i i i ii 
iii it 


_._.J | 


' 



Capetti et al.: HST survey of the B2 sample 

Table 3. Summary of optical data of the sample. 



>°g (P„/WHz-i) 



Fig. 2. Distribution of total power for sources observed 
and not yet observed (shaded) with HST 



n.iiii., 


l_:_ 


=:= 


1 1 




■ 


1-:-:-:-:-:-: 

. J 

i 

[_:_: : 





■ 


i iii! 
1 lll!_ 

+ 1 III 



0.01 0.1 

Redshift 



Fig. 3. Distribution of redshifts for sources observed and 
not yet observed (shaded) with HST 



Name 


Other 


Redshift 


Dust 




Core Jet 




Name 




Morph. 


P.A. 


Opt. Opt. 


0034+25 


UGC00367 


0.0321 


d 


160 




0055+26 


NGC0326 


0.0472 








0055+30 


NGC0315 


0.0167 


d+p 


40 


yes 


0104+32 


NGC0383 


0.0169 


d 


40 


yes 


0116+31 




0.0592 


1 


25 




0120+33 


NGC0507 


0.0164 








0149+35 


NGC0708 


0.0160 


I+P 






0648+27 




0.0409 


P 






0708+32 




0.0672 








0722+30 




0.0191 


1 






0755+37 


NGC2484 


0.0413 






yes yes 


0908+37 




0.1040 


d? 


40 


yes 


0915+32 




0.0620 


d 






0924+30 




0.0266 








1003+26 




0.1165 








1003+35 




0.0989 


1 


50 




1005+28 




0.1476 


P 






1101+38 


MRK 421 


0.0300 






yes 


1113+24 




0.1021 








1204+34 




0.0788 








1217+29 


NGC4278 


0.0021 






yes 


1251+27 


Coma A 


0.0857 


P 




yes 


1256+28 


NGC4869 


0.0224 


d? 






1257+28 


NGC4874 


0.0239 








1321+31 


NGC5127 


0.0161 


1 


45 




1322+36 


NGC5141 


0.0175 


1 


85 




1339+26 


UGC08669 


0.0757 


1 







1346+26 




0.0633 


1 





yes 


1347+28 




0.0724 


P 






1350+31 


UGC08782 


0.0452 


1+P 






1357+28 




0.0629 


1 


95 




1422+26 




0.0370 








1430+25 




0.0813 








1447+27 




0.0306 


1 


145 




1450+28 




0.1265 








1455+28 




0.1411 


1+P 






1457+29 




0.1470 


1 


30 




1502+26 




0.0540 






yes 


1511+26 




0.1078 








1512+30 




0.0931 


P 






1521+28 




0.0825 






yes 


1525+29 


UGC09861 


0.0653 


1 


25 




1527+30 




0.1143 


d? 






1553+24 




0.0426 






yes yes 


1557+26 




0.0442 








1610+29 


NGC6086 


0.0313 








1613+27 




0.0647 


P 






1615+32 




0.1520 






yes 


1626+39 


NGC6166 


0.0303 


P 




yes 


1658+30A 




0.0351 






yes 


1726+31 




0.1670 


1 






1827+32 




0.0659 








1833+32 




0.0578 






yes 


2116+26 


NGC7052 


0.0164 


d 


65 


yes 


2229+39 


UGC12064 


0.0181 


1 


165 


yes 


2236+35 


UGC12127 


0.0277 






yes 


2335+26 


NGC7720 


0.0301 


d 




yes 



ented along P.A. ~ 160°. At larger radii, isophotes are 
very cuspy and oriented at the same position angle as the 
inner disk, which indicates the presence of a stellar disk 
coplanar with the inner one. The galaxy belongs to the 
Zw cluster 0034.4+2532. 

0055+26 (NGC 326): This is a system of two galax- 
ies, also referred to as a dumbbell galaxy. Only the galaxy 
hosting the radio source is shown. The two galaxies do 
not show any peculiarities. There is a third much fainter 



object in the field. The galaxy belongs to a group with 
extended X-ray emission (Worrall et al. 1995 ) 

0055+30 (NGC 315): A highly inclined, very reg- 
ular circum-nuclear disk, is seen in absorption in this 
galaxy. It is oriented at P.A. ~ 40° and extends to r ~ 350 
pc. At its center there is an unresolved nuclear source. Ir- 
regular dust patches are also present on t he Sou th side of 
the galaxy. See also Verdoes Kleijn et al. (1999). 



Capctti et al.: HST survey of the B2 sample 



0104+32 (NGC 383, 3C 31): An extended circum- 
nuclcar dusty disk is seen at low inclination, with an unre- 
solved nuclear component at its center. The disk diameter 
is w 7" (2.5 kpc) along the major axis (P.A. - 40°). The 
galaxy belongs to a chain of which it is the brightest mem- 



ber. See also Martel ct al. (1999) and Verdoes Kleijn et al. 

O- 

0116+31: An S-shaped dust lane bisects its nuclear 
region. Its inner P.A. is ~ 25°. Conway (1996) detected 
a disk of HI in absorption which fully occults one of the 
minilobes and partially covers the other. 

0120+33 (NGC 507): Brightest galaxy of the Zw 
cluster 0107+3212. The galaxy appears very regular and 
smooth. 

0149+35 (NGC 708): A low brightness galaxy 
whose nuclear regions are crossed by an irregular dust lane 
and dust patches. It is the brightest galaxy of the cluster 
Abell 262. 

0648+27: A galaxy with an irregular morphology, en- 
hanced by the presence of dusty features. On its northern 
side there is a chain of knots, probably regions of star 
formation, parallel to the dusty filaments. 

0708+32: The host galaxy does not exhibit any obvi- 
ous peculiarities. 

0722+30: The only source of the B2 sample associ- 
ated with a spiral galaxy. It is a highly inclined galaxy 
which fills the PC field of view. Strong absorption is asso- 
ciated with its disk and a bulge-like component is also 
clearly visible. The radio emission originates from two 
symmetric jet-like features at an angle of 45° to the disk. 

0755+37 (NGC 2484): The galaxy is characterized 
by a central unresolved nuclear source. After subtraction 
of a galaxy elliptical model the presence of a one-sided 
optical jet is revealed, cospatial with the SE brighter radio 
jet. 

0908+37: This galaxy shows a point-like nucleus at 
the center of a highly elongated absorption feature, pos- 
sibly an edge-on disk (P.A. ~ 40°). A fainter companion 
galaxy (outside the image shown) is located 3'.' 7 to the 
SW. 

0915+32: A disk-like dust band surrounds its nuclear 
region. 

0924+30: The host galaxy does not exhibit any obvi- 
ous peculiarities. 

1003+26: A very regular low brightness elliptical 
galaxy with no outstanding morphological features. The 
galaxy belongs to the cluster Abell 923. 

1003+35 (3C 236): An off-centered dust lane crosses 
the galaxy to the S W, w ith » 6" (2.5 kpc) extension. See 
also Martel et al. ( |l999[) . 

1005+28: A diffuse and quite regular galaxy with no 
evident morphological peculiarities. A dust patch is visi- 
ble. 

1101+38: This source is associated with the BL Lac 
object Mrk 421. Not surprisingly it is dominated by its 
bright unresolved nucleus which produces strong diffrac- 



tion spikes. Nonetheless a smooth elliptical host galaxy is 
clearly visible. 

1113+24: A round smooth elliptical galaxy with a 
faint companion ~ 3" to the north. The galaxy is the 
brightest of the Zw cluster 1113.0+2452. 

1204+34: Dust patches produce a spiral structure, 
which is clearly visible in both bands. It extends out to 
at least 2" from a fully resolved nucleus. A secondary, 
again resolved, nucleus is found to the NE at a distance of 
s=s 2" . Both nuclei are embedded in a common elliptical 
halo, centered on the brighter one. 

1217+29 (NGC 4278): This source is associated 
with the nearby galaxy NGC 4278. It shows a regular 
structure only slightly modified by diffuse dust absorp- 
tion to its NW side. The nucleus is unresolved. The ra- 
dio source is very compact, w 1 pc (see, e.g., Schilizzi ct 



al. 1983). The galaxy is known to have strong nuclear emis- 
sion lines (Oster brock |1960 ) . It contains a large amount of 
neutral hydrogen (Raimond et al. 1981) rotating around 
an axis at —45°. 

1251+27 (Coma A, 3C 277.3): In addition to a 
prominent unresolved nucleus, note also the filamentary 
structure located w 7" to the SW. This corresponds to 



the radio knot Kl in van Brcugcl et al. (1985), detected 
also in emission lines. See also Martel et al. ( 1999] ). 

1256+28 (NGC 4869): This galaxy presents a 
highly elongated absorption feature, possibly an edge on 
disk. It belongs to the Coma Cluster (Abell 1656). 

1257+28 (NGC 4874): A very regular low bright- 
ness elliptical galaxy. It is one of the two dominant mem- 
bers of the Coma Cluster (Abell 1656). 

1321+31 (NGC 5127): A dark lane covers the nu- 
cleus of this galaxy and extends out to a radius of 1" , 
P.A. ~ 45°. The galaxy belongs to the Zwicky cluster 



1319.6+3135. See also Verdoes Kleijn et al. fll999| ). 

1322+36 (NGC 5141): There is a wide dust band in 
the center of this galaxy, at P.A. ~ 85°. See also Verdoes 
Kleijn et al. ( |1999| ). 

1339+26: A small dark nuclear band (P.A. ~ 0°) 
characterizes this otherwise very regular galaxy. The 
galaxy is the eastern of a double system and is the domi- 
nant member of the cluster Abell 1775. 

1346+26: A low brightness galaxy with an unresolved 
nucleus and dust in the form of an irregular lane and 
patches (P.A. ~ 0°). A sort of tail is seen to the SW 
towards a companion. It is the brightest galaxy (cD) of 
the cluster Abell 1795. 

1347+28: A regular elliptical galaxy with irregular 
dusty features. It belongs to Abell 1800. 

1350+31: A highly irregular galaxy, with two com- 
pact emission knots separated by a filamentary dust lane 
which extends to form a fan-like shape at larger radii. See 



also Martel et al. (1999). See Akujor et al. (199£) for a 



high resolution radio map showing a flat spectrum core 
with a two sided jet. 



Capetti et al.: HST survey of the B2 sample 



1357+28: A round elliptical galaxy with a small dust 
lane (P.A. ~ 95°) bisecting the nuclear region. 

1422+26: The host galaxy is very smooth with no 
outstanding morphological features. The bright central 
core is fully resolved. 

1430+25: This elliptical galaxy does not exhibit any 
obvious peculiarities. An elongated nucleus has its major 
axis at P.A. ~ 155°. The radio-structure is head-tail type, 
but no obvious cluster or group is visible. 

1441+26: The target is a spiral galaxy. However, com- 
parison of the radio and optical maps shows that this is not 
the host of the radio source. The correct identification is 
with a faint elliptical galaxy located at RA = 14:41:56.35, 
Dec = 26:14:05.0. As the magnitude of this galaxy is well 
below the optical selection threshold of the B2 sample, it 
must be considered a misidentification. 

1447+27: Two off-center linear dust lanes run 0'.'6 and 
l'/2 respectively north-east of the nucleus (P.A. ~ 145°) 
of this otherwise very regular galaxy. 

1450+28: Elliptical galaxy with no outstanding fea- 
tures. In Abell 1984. 

1455+28: The presence of hour-glass shaped dust ab- 
sorption gives this galaxy a quite irregular appearance. 
The central knot is compact but completely resolved. 
Companion galaxy at « 10" . 

1457+29: A wide dust lane (P.A. 30°) runs perpen- 
dicularly to the galaxy projected minor axis. The redshift 
of the galaxy has been measured recently by Gonzalez- 
Serrano & Carballo (2000); this value has been added in 
Tab. |. 

1502+26 (3C 310): A smooth elliptical galaxy with 
a central unresolved source. See Martel et al. (1999). 

1511+26 (3C 315): This galaxy shows a very high 
nuclear cllipticity which contrasts with the typical round- 
ness of the B2 host galaxies. The ellipticity decreases at 
larger radii but the central very elongated central struc- 
ture clearly extends at larger radii, probably indicative of 
a edge-on stellar disk. The radio source has a very pecu- 
liar, two-banana shaped, radio-structure. See de Koff et 
al. ( |1996| ). 

1512+30: The host galaxy does not show any out- 
standing morphological features, except for very faint 
elongated dust absorption at the center. 

1521+28: A well defined unresolved nucleus is super- 
posed on the smooth core of the galaxy. 

1525+29: The double peaked nuclear structure is 
caused by dust absorption, which is extended in the di- 
rection P.A. ~ 25°. The galaxy is the fainter of a pair in 
the cluster Abell 2079. 

1527+30: The faint absorption from a possibly disk- 
like dust band is visible on the west side of this galaxy, 
extending to a radius of 0'.'3. Its central region is resolved. 
In Abell 2083. 

1553+24: This galaxy exhibits a point-like nucleus 
and, after removal of an elliptical model for the galaxy 



emission, a faint one-sided optical jet, cospatial with the 
NW brighter radio jet. 

1557+26: A smooth and regular elliptical galaxy. 

1610+29 (NGC 6086): This galaxy does not exhibit 
any obvious peculiarities. It is the brightest galaxy of the 
cluster Abell 2162. 

1613+27: Very faint absorption features are seen to 
the SW on this otherwise regular galaxy. 

1615+32 (3C 332): The emission of this source is 
dominated by its bright unresolved nucleus. A companion 
is seen to SW. 

1626+39 (NGC 6166, 3C 338): Brightest galaxy 
of the cluster Abell 2199. An unresolved nucleus is su- 
perposed on the flat core of the galaxy. An arc-like dust 
feature extends from to nucleus to the W for « 3" . Two 
fainte r ellip tical companions are also present, (see Martel 
et al. |1998p . 

1658+30: Smooth galaxy with a central unresolved 
core. The subtraction of an elliptical galaxy model reveals 
the presence of a faint one-sided optical jet, cospatial with 
the radio jet. 

1726+31 (3C 357): The central knot is well resolved. 
A dust lane is also present on its SW side. 

1827+32: Round galaxy with a possible weak nucleus. 

1833+32 (3C 382): This source is associated with 
the broad line radio galaxy 3C382. The nuclear emission 
dominates the optical emission but the underlying host 
gal axy is clearly seen in these images. See also Martel et 
al. ( |1999D . 

2116+26 (NGC 7052): A spectacular, highly in- 
clined disk- like structure of dust (at P.A. ~ 65°) surrounds 
the ce ntral source of this galaxy. See also Verdoes Kleijn 
et al. ( 1999 ). From the ki nema tics of the gas disk van der 
Marel & van den Bosch ( |1998|) deduced the presence of a 
central black hole with a mass of 3 x 10 8 M e . 

2229+39 (3C 449): A wide band of absorption is 
located on the West side of this source, at P.A. ~ 165°. 
See also Martel et al. ( 1999] ). Note also the prominent 
unresolved nuclear source. 

2236+35: A faint nucleus, probably unresolved, is 
seen in this elliptical galaxy. 

2335+26 (NGC 7720, 3C 465): It is the brightest 
galaxy in the cluster Abell 2634. An elliptical region of 
dust absorption is located around the bright unre solved 
nucleus of this galaxy. See also Martel et al. (1999). 



4-2. Discussion 

All B2 sources are hosted by bright elliptical galaxies, with 
the only exception of B2 0722+30, which is associated to 
a spiral galaxy. While this result might appear surprising, 
we must note that both the size (9 kpc) and the radio 
luminosity (log P t = 22.67) of this source place it at the 
lowest end of the range covered by the B2 sample. On the 
other hand these values are quite typical of radio-sources 



Capctti et al.: HST survey of the B2 sample 



199S) which 



associated to Seyfert galaxies (Nagar et al. 
are indeed associated to spiral galaxies. 

Brightness profiles of all elliptical host galaxies which 
are not severely affected by dust extinction can be suc- 
cessfully represented by a Nuker law (Lauer et al. 1995| ). 
In all cases we found evidence for a well resolved, shallow 
(7 < 0.3) central cusp, as expected given their range of 
absolute magnitudes, My from —20 to —23. 

In 18 of the 57 ( ~ 32 %) B2 sources observed with the 
HST we found evidence for an unresolved nuclear source 
(see Tab. ||) down a magnitude level of V = 23.5. The de- 
tection rate is slightly lower than the percentage (between 
43 an d 54 %) found for 3C sources with z < 0.1 (Martel 
et al. 1999 ). This discrepancy can be accounted for noting 
that B2 sources have on aver age fa inter radio cores than 
3C sources (Giovannini et al. 1988 ) and that the optical 
emission in FR I nuclei st rongly correlate with the radio 
core flux (Chiaberge et al. 1999 ). We thus expect that B2 
galaxies harbour fainter optical cores which might be more 
difficult to detect against the galaxy background. Indeed 
the B2 sources in which we detected an optical core have 
higher radio core fluxes and more dominant cores than 
average. 

Dust is frequently present in B2 sources: after visual 
inspection of the images we found that 33/57 (58 %) of 
them show dust features, either in the form of bands or 
disk-like structures, or more irregular patches. The per- 
centage may be slightly higher than in 3C sources with 
z < 0.1, which have 37-48 % of sources with dust. Con- 
cerning the presence of dust features it does not appear 
that there is any difference between FR I and FR II ob- 
jects: the FR I sources with dust are 19/35 (54 %), while 
the FR III and FR II with dust are 8/12 (66 % ). Our 
data strengthen the findings by Martel et al. ( |1999| ) which 
found disk-like structures only associated to FR I type 
radio sources (see Tabs. || and ||). Indeed in the B2 sam- 
ple, although dust is equally present in FR I and FR II 
sources, it is found to be ordered into disk-like structures 
in 9 FR Is while this behaviour is never found in FR lis. 
However, the detection of dusty disks is almost exclusive 
of nearby (z ;$ 0.03) galaxies. Within this distance there 
are only a handful of FR II in the 3C sample and none in 
the B2. This raises the question of the importance of the 
observational biases in our ability of finding such disks in 
FR II sources. Among the 18 sources with an optical core 
9 also show the presence of dust, while no dust is detected 
in the remaining 9; a slightly higher rate of dust occur- 
rence (24/39) is found among the sources without optical 
core. This suggests that extended dust structures might 
be hiding optical cores in a few cases. We find no connec- 
tion between dust content and with largest radio linear 
size: the sources with dust have a median linear size of 
94 ± 35 kpc, against 76 ± 30 for the sources without dust. 

A first scrutiny of the B2 data indicates that detec- 
tion of optical counter part of radio jet is not particu- 
larly rare. At present we have found three optical jets, in 



B2 0755+37, B2 1553+24 and B2 1658+30A (see Tab. |), 
but we do not exclude that a more refined analysis will 
produce a few more. Therefore optical jets in HST images 
of these low luminosity radio galaxies might be detected 
in a sizeable fraction of the sample, probably comparable 
with the 13 % found in the low redshift 3C sources. All 
optical jets are associated to strongly one-sided sources, of 
relatively small linear sizes and with prominent radio nu- 
clei in agreement with the results by Sparks et al. (1995). 



5. SUMMARY AND FUTURE WORK 

We have presented HST/WFPC2 snapshot images in two 
bands (V and I) of 57 (out of a total of ~ 100) sources from 
the B2 sample of low luminosity radio-galaxies. One more 
object (1441+26), not shown in Fig. 4 has been found to 
be a mis-identification since the radio source appears to 
be associated with a background galaxy whose magnitude 
is below the optical selection threshold of the sample. Ex- 
cept for B2 0722+30, which is associated with a spiral 
galaxy, all sources are hosted by bright elliptical galaxies 
well fitted by Nuker laws, with shallow central cusps. 

Most of the galaxies present a peculiar morphology. Al- 
most 60 % show the presence of large scale dust structures 
which in 9 cases (all FR I radio sources) is distributed in 
well defined disks. In three sources we detected an op- 
tical synchrotron jet. The presence of central unresolved 
sources is revealed in 18 galaxies. 

The present work is only a first presentation of the 
HST snapshot survey of B2 radio galaxies. While await- 
ing completion of the survey, more detailed studies will be 
presented in the near future. In particular an analysis of 
the brightness profiles will be given with a comparison of 
samples of powerful radio galaxies as well as non active 
galaxies, together with an exhaustive search for optical 
jets. Because of the relatively large number of objects it 
may be possible to study the orientation of optical fea- 
tures, such as dust-disks and -lanes, as compared to the 
main radio axes. Also the statistics of unresolved cores 
will be discussed in the framework of Unified Models, and 
in this respect a comparison with the sample of BL Lac 
objects that has already been observed with the HST will 
become crucial. 

Acknowledgements. This research has made use of the 
NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED) which is oper- 
ated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of 
Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration. 



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